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Bike Museum

At our shop on Pearl Street in Boulder, we have a cross-section of over 50 bicycles from 1888 to 2004. Feel free to drop in and take a look!


Dede Barry's Silver Medal TT Bike

Dede Barry’s silver-medal time trial bike from the 2004 Olympic games in Athens, Greece. Unlike most road bikes at the time, Giant used compact road geometry; notice the extreme negative angle of the stem to compensate for the taller front end (#slamthatstem).

Klein Mantra

The Mantra was Klein’s longest travel full-suspension with a whopping 70mm of travel. One stand-out feature is the URT suspension design in which the rear shock can only compress when seated, making the bicycle stiff and responsive when climbing out of the saddle, yet comfortable when seated on rough terrain. By 1998, these Kleins were produced by Trek Bicycles in Waterloo, Wisconsin.

1998 Harley Davidson

1998 Harley Davidson - Built by GT Bicycles to commemorate Harley Davidson’s anniversary, the Harley Davidson Astroglides were designed to resemble the classic Harley look. They even share some components with Harley motorcycles, such as the token on the gas tank. Only 1,000 were ever made, and this is #778.

1998 Harley Davidson

1998 Harley Davidson - Built by GT Bicycles to commemorate Harley Davidson’s anniversary, the Harley Davidson Astroglides were designed to resemble the classic Harley look. They even share some components with Harley motorcycles, such as the token on the gas tank. Only 1,000 were ever made, and this is #2.

1996 ProFlex

The 1996 ProFlex was designed by Bob Girvin to be an efficient, yet active full-suspension mountain bike. The most striking feature is the linkage-driven front suspension, which provided a stiff and responsive ride. The rear suspension linkage was designed to be active in the big and middle chainrings, while becoming more efficient in the small ring with “Dig In Technology.”

1995 Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo 

1995 Gary Fisher Hoo Koo E Koo “Grateful Dead Edition” - This rare Hoo Koo E Koo was a part of a special edition run with decals designed by Prairie Prince. This collectors item was purchased on August 9, 1995 - the day Grateful Dead lead singer Jerry Garcia died - in memory of the iconic musician. The bicycle was built up and then never ridden. Note the sports card in the rear spokes: That’s basketball legend Bill Walton, a huge GD fan. Visiting UBikes years ago, Bill used his long reach to place the card neatly in the wheel.

1994 Amp Research Design

1994 Amp Research Design - Bizarre yet cool! Designed and manufactured by AMP Research in Laguna Beach, California. Owned and operated by Horst Leitner, the inventor of the “Horst-Link” drop out, which is well known today in rear suspension tech. The compact F1 linkage fork is a bit of a marvel even today. Horst designed it to emulate the axle path of a telescopic fork, while keeping the moving bits up top, so he could still use cable-operated rim-brakes.

1991 Tommasini TT Bike

This Tommasini time trial bike is a testament to early 1990s racing geometry. Built with a 700c rear disc wheel, a 650c front wheel, and a downward sloping top tube, this bicycle was designed to put the rider in the lowest, and supposedly most aerodynamic position.

1991 Klein Pinnacle

Manufactured by Klein Bikes from 1988 - 1994, the Pinnacle was an all-around MTB used for racing and touring. Founder Gary Klein broke new ground with oversized 6061 aluminum tubing and internal cable routing, making his bikes 15% lighter than steel bikes of the era.

Davis Phinney’s 1989 Eddy Merckx Team Bike

Boulder Colorado-native Davis Phinney’s race bike from his time on the 7-Eleven professional race team. Davis raced from 1982 -1993, winning two stages of the Tour de France and the 1988 Coors Classic. 7-Eleven used Eddy Merckx frames from 1989 - 1996.

1988 50th Anniversary Schwinn Paramount  

As with all the Schwinn Paramounts, this bicycle was designed with racing in mind. One striking feature of this build is the gold Super Record groupset, designed for Campagnolo’s 50th anniversary (in 1983). This “50/50 bike” has never been ridden, preserved for all to enjoy.

Andy Hampsten’s 1988 Huffy Time Trial Bike

This is the other bike that Andy used to win the 1988 Giro D’Italia. Built by Mike Melton using True Temper aluminum tubing, on this bicycle Andy won the stage 18 time trial and added more than a minute to his lead over Eric Breukink.

Andy Hampsten’s 1988 Huffy Team Bike 

Andy rode this bike when he won the 1988 Giro D’Italia, becoming the first non-European to do so. This bike carried him up the iconic Gavia Pass through a snowstorm, putting him in the Maglia Rosa for the remainder of the race. Although the 7-Eleven team was sponsored by Huffy, their bikes were produced by Serotta. However, after breaking a Serotta frame in the 1988 La Fleche-Wallonne, Hampsten had his frame build by LandShark.

1986 DeRosa Professional 

A beautiful piece of bike racing history, this 1986 DeRosa shines in its Ortensia green paint. Ugo DeRosa’s framebuilding made its way into the pro peloton in 1958. Known around the world as the bike Eddie Merckx rode in his winning years from 1973 - 1978. DeRosa was also Merckx’ mechanic during this period.

1985 Ritchey Aspen

Designed as a more affordable bike, the TIG welded Ritchey Aspen was slotted as a “bang for your buck” option. Like many 1980s mountain bikes, it had a fairly slack head tube at 69°, similar to many cross-country bikes today.

Otis Taylor’s 1984 Serotta 

Custom-built Serotta for world-famous blues musician and banjo player, Otis Taylor. Otis has a deep history with cycling in the Denver, Colorado region. His involvement with track cycling centered around his time coaching three-time US national sprint champion Scott Berryman.

1984 Cannondale SM500 

The Cannondale SM500 is a unique take on a mountain bike. It features Cannondale’s lightweight aluminum tubing, which was much wider than much of the steel tubing of the day. Even more unusual was the 24-inch rear wheel, which Cannondale claimed would increase climbing ability.

1983 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport 

Vintage MTBs don’t get any sweeter than this 1983 Stumpjumper.  Among the first mountain bikes to be mass produced, they used steel lugging, canties, and 3x5 gearing to introduce the world to off-road cycling. Over the years, the Stumpjumper has remained an iconic Specialized model, and is one of the best full-suspension bicycles offered today.

1983 Specialized Stumpjumper Sport  

Vintage MTBs don’t get any sweeter than this 1983 Stumpjumper.  Among the first mountain bikes to be mass produced, they used steel lugging, canties, and 3x5 gearing to introduce the world to off-road cycling. Over the years, the Stumpjumper has remained an iconic Specialized model, and is one of the best full-suspension bicycles offered today.

1982 Eisentraut 

This 1982 Eisentraut features Campagnolo’s 50th anniversary Super Record gruppo. Framebuilder Albert Eisentraut has a deep history in the American framebuilding community, mentoring many well-known framebuilders such as Joe Breeze, an early mountain bike designer; Bruce Gordon, look for his 1977, 16-pound track bike in the collection; and Mark Nobilette, who built frames for Rivendell Bicycles, Zinn, and GT.

1981 Bianchi Pista Track Bike 

Built for the track, this Columbus-tubed, Campagnolo-equipped machine was a solid choice for racers. Manufactured in Milan, Italy, in January 1981, and painted in classic celeste.

1980 Colnago Mexico

One of Doug’s favorite bikes in the collection. Colnago started producing the Mexico model to celebrate Eddy Merckx’s 1972 world hour record. The Colnago Mexico was a bit different from the Colnago Super and built with thinner Columbus tubes. The Mexico was known for its short, light and stiff race geometry.

1977 Bruce Gordon

This fine piece of bicycle craftsmanship comes from the hands of renowned frame builder, Bruce Gordon. A shop favorite for its feathery 16-pound weight, Campagnolo gruppo, and stunning purple paint, this bike was believed to have been made for the 1977 New York Bicycle Show.

1973 Alan Super Record 

Alan frames were constructed by bonding tubes and lugs using a special glue borrowed from the aeronautical industry. Alan was the first company to introduce an all-aluminum road frame made from aerospace-grade aluminum. Lighter and stiffer than steel bikes, Alan bikes climb and descend with confidence.

1972 Schwinn Paramount Track Bike

Legendary. Schwinn made these incredible track bikes from 1940 - 1986, delivering reliable performance throughout this period. This 1972 model has a handmade lugged Reynolds 531 butted frame mated to Campagnolo hubs, Campy crank and BB, Campy headset.

1972 Raleigh Professional 

A proper British race bike. Built in England and raced on the track, the Professional represents a bicycling era that stand alone in history. An English-made Reynolds 531 butted tubeset provides the foundation for peak track performance.

1969 Schwinn Fastback 

The Fastback was produced from 1966 - 1976 and shared the spotlight with the Stingray. Essentially a lightweight version of the Stingray, it quickly became a bestseller. This five-speed model combines the easy pedaling of a lightweight with the maneuverability of the original Stingray. The 1969 MSRP of $79 is equivalent to $542 in 2019.

1968 Schwinn Stingray DLX 

Known as “the bike with the sports car look,” the iconic Stingray was manufactured by Schwinn from 1963 - 1981. This classic Campus Green model has a coaster brake. Schwinn targeted American youth with these bicycles and sold lots of them!

1968 Schwinn Paramount Step-Through

One of our favorite bikes in the shop. This rare Paramount step-through model features Campagnolo Record bar end shifting and a special chrome finish.

1968 Cinelli Track Bike 

Cinelli represents Italian style and performance. Based in Milan, Italy, Cinelli has manufactured bicycles since 1948. Started by Cino Cinelli who raced from 1937 - 1944, and won the Milan-San Remo in 1943. Beautiful Reynolds lugged steel.

1968 Cinelli Track Bike 

Cinelli represents Italian style and performance. Based in Milan, Italy, Cinelli has manufactured bicycles since 1948. Started by Cino Cinelli who raced from 1937 - 1944, and won the Milan-San Remo in 1943. Beautiful Reynolds lugged steel and retro wheel covers give this track bike a special look.

1967 Schwinn Fastback with Baseball Bat Holder 

Cool, cool, cool! The coppertone paint and baseball bat holder make this Fastback a crowd favorite at UBikes. Many customers are instantly transported to a youthful state of mind when seeing this bike.

1964 Schwinn Paramount Track Tandem 

Referred to as the “Choice of Champions,” Schwinn Paramount track bikes were hard to beat at the velodrome. This awesome 1964 tandem was built for the US team to compete in the summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan.

1963 Schwinn Varsity 

Manufactured from 1951 - 1986, the Varsity model was a staple in the Schwinn line-up for more than 30 years. This 1963 version in Radiant Sky Blue features an eight-speed drivetrain, 27-inch wheels and sold for $66.95.

1954 Schwinn Phantom 

Another example of Schwinn’s superior build quality. Beautiful lines and a smooth ride experience made this bike stand out in the Schwinn line-up.

1952 Schwinn Panther Model D-27 

One of Schwinn’s most popular models of all time and an excellent example of an unrestored original. Manufactured from 1950 to 1954, its “ultra modern” design and rugged steel frame combined with Schwinn’s classic spring fork enabled this bike to stand the test of time! This bike is so solid that you could pull if off the wall, put air in the tires, and go for a ride!

1952 Schwinn Black Phantom

The Phantom had a production run from 1949 - 1959. Classic Schwinn styling and lots of chrome made this a dream bike for many boys of the era.

1951 Schwinn Starlet

As described in the 1951 Schwinn catalog: “The Starlet is the finest bicycle styled especially for young ladies. A brilliant new bicycle design from the Schwinn drawing boards, the Starlet is queen of the line! Choose from such gorgeous fashion-wise hues as Holiday Rose and Summer Cloud White, Windswept Green and Luscious Lavender combinations. These sparkling pastel colors are further set off by a White Koroseal-top saddle and white grips. Complete with streamlined tank, brilliant Rocket-Ray lamp, sturdy luggage carrier, and sleek chainguard.”

1950 (circa) Swiss Army Bike

Built between 1905 and 1989 by Schwalbe, Cäsar, Cosmos and Condor. Swiss bicycle infantry were phased out in 2001. The 2001 plate on the back of this bike suggests that this particular example was in use for 51 years!

1950 (circa) East German Trick Bike

These bikes were manufactured specifically for performances involving incredible balance, strength, and agility. Artistic cycling has been dominated by German riders over the decades and is still a UCI World Cup discipline.

1950 (circa) Colibri Kid’s Bike

Made in Italy. Beyond that, we don’t have much history on this little guy, but It sure is cute!

1949 J. C. Higgins

Sold through Sears department stores, the J. C. Higgins brand competed against Schwinn, Hawthorne and Columbia, to name a few manufacturers of the time. Unique features included the “beehive” flowmotion ride suspension, skirt guard, and cat’s eye axle reflectors.

1941 Schwinn AutoCycle Super Deluxe

This beauty has twin headlights, spring fork, front wheel brake, sparkling chrome carrier, cantilever-type frame, built-in speedometer with a styled tank, and chain guard. Top-of-the-line 1941 model from Arnold Schwinn.

1940 (circa) Schwinn Ace

Another classic from Arnold Schwinn Co. This bike reflects an era when air travel was luxurious and Hollywood was booming. The graphics kit expresses the Art Deco-style and transports us back in time.

1938 Hawthorne Zep 

At the top of the Hawthorne line the Zep was advertised as “Supreme beauty - deluxe equipment.” Special features include twin Delta Silver Ray headlights, built-in tail light, three-way lock, and a chrome chain guard. It’s price in 1938 was $34.95. The Hawthorne brand was offered by the Montgomery Ward department store and built by the Cleveland Welding Co.

1938 Monark Silver King “Wingbar” 

The Wingbar is Art Deco styling at its finest. And, this was the first all-aluminum bicycle made and sold in the USA, long before aluminum frames were a “thing.” Its aluminum frame and 24-inch wheels gave this bicycle a unique spot in history.

1937 Mercury De Lux No. 55 

Coming in at a mere 45 pounds, this Art Deco-era bicycle combined style with heft! Along with many other bikes of the time, the steel tubing and components used to create the “look” often meant sacrificing efficiency and weight.

1936 Elgin Robin

A bicycle made for people who wanted to cruise in style. A zeppelin-inspired toptube tank and full fenders created this artful piece of cycling history. One of many bicycle companies in the Chicagoland area, Elgin made bikes from 1890 to the 1940s.

1934 Schwinn Motorbike 

Manufactured by the Arnold Schwinn Company of Chicago, Illinois. Prior to 1933, bicycle tires were mostly solid. The Motorbike was one of the first bicycles to offer “balloon” tires that were larger in volume and used inner tubes, which greatly improved the cycling experience and helped to propel Schwinn to the top of the industry.

1928 Bastide Stayer “Derny Bike”

The Stayer or “Gangmaker” style of track bike was specifically designed to be ridden behind a derny motopacer. These bikes hit top speeds of 40-50 mph while riding in the derny slipstream. The reversed fork and smaller front wheel created unparalleled tracking and maximum aerodynamics.

1917 Mead Ranger 

Mead Cycle was a famous bicycle company that once had huge production facilities in England and Chicago, Illinois. They primarily were a mail order operation that sold bicycles worldwide. Of their many bicycle lines, the premier was the Ranger line. From five color choices, most Rangers were painted in “Ranger Brown.”

1910 Montauk Photo Bike 

A turn-of-the-century bicycle mated to an antique Montauk camera from 1900 - essentially the world’s first Go Pro!

1908 M.C. Mfg. Co. Defiance

Monarch Cycle Manufacturing Company was founded by John William Kiser in 1892 with savings from his time with the Chicago Sewing Machine Co. where he worked for about 10 years. The Defiance was a popular model for M.C. Mfg.. Co and was part of the “Golden Age” for bicycle manufacturing and sales. Sold for about $100 each, they were offered with a few options including frame pump and lantern.

1898 Pioneer Tricycle

Manufactured by Gendron Wheel Company. It is small. It is old. It has three wheels.

1897 ACME Stormer

Manufactured by the ACME Manufacturing Company of Reading, Pennsylvania. Priced from $40 to $100, ACME’s aim was to create high-quality bicycles at affordable prices. Each catalog included a telegraph code with which to order a new bicycle. The order for this bike might read: ABOVE BENEFIT TUBE HOLD SOLID GENERAL PROUD CAPTURE, which means: Ship immediately by express. Model 6, 23-inch frame. Vim single tube tires. Handle bar, drop pattern. Saddle, Stormer, Russet. Gear 63. Pedals, Combination. Green finish frame.

1895 Sterling Women’s 

Manufactured by Sterling Bicycle Company (also known as Sterling Cycle Works) of Chicago, Illinois. The Sterling was made popular by Annie “Londonderry” Kopchovsky’s ride “around the world” in 1894. At the time, you could be the proud owner of a Sterling bicycle for $50-$100, depending on model and year.

1889 Columbia High Wheeler

Manufactured by the Pope Manufacturing Company of Boston, Massachusetts. Columbia bicycles were the first bicycles produced in the US. Production started in 1878, at the Weed Sewing Machine Company in Hartford, Connecticut. This Columbia Light Roadster is one of the last new high wheeler models since safety bicycles became more en vogue in the following years. It retailed for $100-$135.

1888 Hickory Step-Through and Men’s

Manufactured by the Hickory Wheel Company of South Framingham, Massachusetts. These bikes were built with the company’s patented hickory wood wheels and ball bearing hubs. The Hickory Wheel Company manufactured most of the wooden wheels for bicycles from 1880 - 1920.